Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

n/a

Abstract Title:

Reduced subclinical carotid vascular disease and arterial stiffness in vegetarian men: The CARVOS Study.

Abstract Source:

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Dec 20. Epub 2016 Dec 20. PMID: 28062141

Abstract Author(s):

Julio Acosta-Navarro, Luiza Antoniazzi, Adriana Midori Oki, Maria Carlos Bonfim, Valeria Hong, Pedro Acosta-Cardenas, Celia Strunz, Eleonora Brunoro, Marcio Hiroshi Miname, Wilson Salgado Filho, Luiz Aparecido Bortolotto, Raul D Santos

Article Affiliation:

Julio Acosta-Navarro

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Dietary habits play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. The objective of this study was to verify if vegetarian (VEG) diet could be related a better profile of subclinical vascular disease evaluated by arterial stiffness and functional and structural properties of carotid arteries, compared to omnivorous (OMN) diet.

METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 44 VEG and 44 OMN apparently healthy men≥35years of age, in order to not have confounding risk factors of subclinical atherosclerosis, were assessed for anthropometric data, blood pressure, blood lipids, glucose, C reactive protein (CRP), and arterial stiffness determined by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). Also, carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT) and distensibility were evaluated.

RESULTS: VEG men had lower body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, fasting serum total cholesterol, LDL and non-HDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, glucose and glycated hemoglobin values in comparison with OMN individuals (all p values<0.05). Markers of vascular structure and function were different between VEG and OMN: PWV 7.1±0.8m/s vs. 7.7±0.9m/s (p<0.001); c-IMT 593±94 vs. 661±128μm (p=0.003); and relative carotid distensibility 6.39±1.7 vs. 5.72±1.8% (p=0.042), respectively. After a multivariate linear regression analysis, a VEG diet was independently and negatively associated with PWV (p value 0.005).

CONCLUSIONS: A VEG diet is associated with a more favorable cardiovascular diseases biomarker profile and better vascular structural and functional parameters.

Print Options


Key Research Topics

Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2019 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.