Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

Abstract Title:

Coffee attenuates fibrosis by decreasing the expression of TGF-β and CTGF in a murine model of liver damage.

Abstract Source:

J Appl Toxicol. 2013 Sep ;33(9):970-9. Epub 2012 Aug 17. PMID: 22899499

Abstract Author(s):

Jonathan Arauz, Marina Galicia- Moreno, Pedro Cortés-Reynosa, Eduardo Pérez Salazar, Pablo Muriel

Article Affiliation:

Jonathan Arauz

Abstract:

This study was performed to evaluate the antifibrotic properties of coffee in a model of liver damage induced by repeated administration of thioacetamide (TAA) in male Wistar rats. In this study, cirrhosis was induced by chronic TAA administration and the effects of co-administration of conventional caffeinated coffee or decaffeinated coffee (CC, DC, respectively) for 8 weeks were evaluated. TAA administration elevated serum alkaline phosphatase (AP), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GTP) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT), liver lipid peroxidation, collagen content, depleted liver glycogen and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Additionally increased levelsof a number of proteins were detected including transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, 9 and 13. Coffee suppressed most of the changes produced by TAA. Histopathological analysis was in agreement with biochemical and molecular findings. These results indicate that coffee attenuates experimental cirrhosis; the action mechanisms are probably associated with its antioxidant properties and mainly by its ability to block the elevation of the profibrogenic cytokine TGF-β and its downstream effector CTGF. Various components of coffee that have been related to such a favorable effect include caffeine, coffee oils kahweol, cafestol and antioxidant substances; however, no definite evidence for the role of these components has been established. These results support earlier findings suggesting a beneficial effect of coffee on the liver. However, more basic clinical studies must be performed to confirm this hypothesis.

Study Type : Animal Study

Print Options


Key Research Topics

Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2019 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.