Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

n/a
Abstract Title:

The effect of nuts on markers of glycemic control: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Abstract Source:

Am J Clin Nutr. 2019 Feb 1 ;109(2):297-314. PMID: 30722007

Abstract Author(s):

Alyssa M Tindall, Emily A Johnston, Penny M Kris-Etherton, Kristina S Petersen

Article Affiliation:

Alyssa M Tindall

Abstract:

Background: Observational evidence suggests higher nut consumption is associated with better glycemic control; however, it is unclear if this association is causal.

Objectives: We aimed to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to examine the effect of tree nuts and peanuts on markers of glycemic control in adults.

Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was conducted. A total of 1063 potentially eligible articles were screened in duplicate. From these articles, 40 were eligible for inclusion and data from these articles were extracted in duplicate. The weighted mean difference (WMD) between the nut intervention and control arms was determined for fasting glucose, fasting insulin, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) using the DerSimonian and Laird random-effects method. For outcomes where a limited number of studies were published, a qualitative synthesis was presented.

Results: A total of 40 randomized controlled trials including 2832 unique participants, with a median duration of 3 mo (range: 1-12 mo), were included. Overall consumption of tree nuts or peanuts had a favorable effect on HOMA-IR (WMD: -0.23; 95% CI: -0.40, -0.06; I2 = 51.7%) and fasting insulin (WMD: -0.40 μIU/mL; 95% CI: -0.73, -0.07 μIU/mL; I2 = 49.4%). There was no significant effect of nut consumption on fasting blood glucose (WMD: -0.52 mg/dL; 95% CI: -1.43, 0.38 mg/dL; I2 = 53.4%) or HbA1c (WMD: 0.02%; 95% CI: -0.01%, 0.04%; I2 = 51.0%).

Conclusions: Consumption of peanuts or tree nuts significantly decreased HOMA-IR and fasting insulin; there was no effect of nut consumption on HbA1c or fasting glucose. The results suggest that nut consumption may improve insulin sensitivity. In the future, well-designed clinical trials are required to elucidate the mechanisms that account for these observedeffects.

Study Type : Meta Analysis, Review

Print Options


Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2019 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.