Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

Abstract Title:

The prevalence of hypocobalaminaemia in cats with spontaneous hyperthyroidism.

Abstract Source:

J Small Anim Pract. 2011 Feb;52(2):101-6. PMID: 21265849

Abstract Author(s):

A K Cook, J S Suchodolski, J M Steiner, J E Robertson

Article Affiliation:

Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences GI Laboratory, Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine, College Station, TX 77843, USA.

Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of hypocobalaminaemia in cats with moderate to severe hyperthyroidism and to investigate the relationship between cobalamin status and selected haematologic parameters. Methods: Serum cobalamin concentrations were measured in 76 spontaneously hyperthyroid cats [serum thyroxine (T(4) ) concentration≥100 nmol/L] and 100 geriatric euthyroid cats. Erythrocyte and neutrophil counts in hyperthyroid cats with hypocobalaminaemia were compared with those in hyperthyroid cats with adequate serum cobalamin concentrations (≥290 ng/L).

RESULTS: The median cobalamin concentration in hyperthyroid cats was lower than the control group (409 versus 672 ng/L; P=0·0040). In addition, 40·8% of hyperthyroid cats had subnormal serum cobalamin concentrations compared with 25% of controls (P=0·0336). Weak negative correlation (coefficient: -0·3281) was demonstrated between serum cobalamin and T(4) concentrations in the hyperthyroid population, and the mediancobalamin concentration was lower in cats with T(4) above the median of 153 nmol/L compared with cats with T(4) below this value (P=0·0281). Hypocobalaminaemia was not associated with neutropenia or anaemia in hyperthyroid cats.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This study indicates that a substantial proportion of cats with T(4)≥100 nmol/L are hypocobalaminaemic and suggests that hyperthyroidism directly or indirectly affects cobalamin uptake, excretion or utilisation in this species.

Study Type : Animal Study

Print Options


Key Research Topics

Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2019 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.