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Abstract Title:

Switching from a high-fat cellulose diet to a high-fat pectin diet reverses certain obesity-related morbidities.

Abstract Source:

Nutr Metab (Lond). 2018 ;15:55. Epub 2018 Aug 6. PMID: 30093912

Abstract Author(s):

Julie K Bray, Gabriel S Chiu, Leslie K McNeil, Morgan L Moon, Robyn Wall, Albert E Towers, Gregory G Freund

Article Affiliation:

Julie K Bray

Abstract:

Background: Reducing caloric intake is a proven intervention for mitigating and modulating morbidities associated with overnutrition. Caloric restriction is difficult to affect clinically, therefore, dietary interventions that ameliorate the adverse consequences of overnutrition in the presence of a high-calorie diet would be of value.

Methods: Mice were fed an obesogenic diet containing 60% fat + 10% cellulose (HFC), or a control diet containing 10% fat + 10% cellulose (LFC) for 12 wks. Subgroups of mice were then switched from HFC to each of the following diets for an additional 5 wks: 1) 60% fat + 10% pectin (HFP), 2) LFC or 3) 10% fat + 10% pectin (LFP). To test for statistical differences, one-way or two-way ANOVAs were used with or without repeated measurements as needed.

Results: In comparison to HFC, HFP prevented additional weight gain while LFC and LFP triggered weight loss of 22.2 and 25.4%, respectively. Mice continued on HFC experienced a weight increase of 26% during the same 5 wk. interval. After 12 wks, HFC decreased mouse locomotion by 18% when compared to control diet, but a diet switch to LFC or LFP restored mouse movement. Importantly, HFP, LFC, and LFP reduced fasting blood glucose when compared to HFC. Likewise, HFP, LFC and LFP improved glucose tolerance and decreased fatty liver by 37.9, 49.8, 53.6 and 20.2%, 37.2, 43.7%, respectively.

Conclusions: Taken together, the results indicate that the dietary fiber pectin can mitigate some adverse consequences of overnutrition even in the presence of high-fat.

Study Type : Animal Study

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Sayer Ji
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