Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

Abstract Title:

Acute effect of fructose intake from sugar-sweetened beverages on plasma uric acid: a randomised controlled trial.

Abstract Source:

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Jun 22. Epub 2016 Jun 22. PMID: 27329612

Abstract Author(s):

E L Carran, S J White, A N Reynolds, J J Haszard, B J Venn

Article Affiliation:

E L Carran

Abstract:

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Excessive fructose intake has been linked to hyperuricaemia. Our aim was to test whether 355 and 600 ml of commercial sugar-sweetened soft drinks would acutely raise plasma uric acid.

SUBJECTS/METHODS: Forty-one participants were randomised to a control group or an intervention group. The control group consumed 600 ml of fructose and 600 ml of glucose beverages. The soft drink group consumed 355 and 600 ml of beverages in random order. The control beverages were matched for fructose content with 600 ml of soft drink (26.7 g). Blood samples were collected at baseline, 30 and 60 min and analysed forplasma uric acid.

RESULTS: Plasma uric acid concentrations were 13 (95% confidence interval: (CI): 3, 23) and 17 μmol/l (95% CI: 6, 28) higher 30 and 60 min after consumption of 600 ml of soft drink compared with the glucose control. The corresponding values for the fructose beverage were 22 (95% CI: 16, 29) and 23 μmol/l (95% CI: 14, 33). There was no significant difference in the increase in uricacid following the 600-ml soft drink compared with the fructose control at 30 min (6 μmol/l; 95% CI: -4, 15) or 60 min (5 μmol/l; 95% CI: -7, 17). There was no difference in the uric-acid-raising effect between the 355 and 600 ml volumes at 30 min (-1 μmol/l; 95% CI: -9, 6) or 60 min (-5 μmol/l; 95% CI: -10, 1).

CONCLUSION: Small and transient increases in plasma uric acid are likely after consumption of sucrose-sweetened commercially available single-serve soft drinks in volumes as small as 355 ml.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 22 June 2016; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2016.112.

Study Type : Human Study

Print Options


Key Research Topics

Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2019 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.