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Article Publish Status: FREE
Abstract Title:

Impact of perinatal exposure to sucrose or high fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55) on adiposity and hepatic lipid composition in rat offspring.

Abstract Source:

J Physiol. 2017 Apr 26. Epub 2017 Apr 26. PMID: 28447343

Abstract Author(s):

Carla R Toop, Beverly S Muhlhausler, Kerin O'Dea, Sheridan Gentili

Article Affiliation:

Carla R Toop

Abstract:

Perinatal exposure to excess maternal intake of added sugars, including fructose and sucrose, is associated with an increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in adult life. However, it is unknown to what extent the type of sugar and the timing of exposure affect these outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of exposure to maternal consumption of a 10% w/v beverage containing sucrose or high fructose corn syrup-55 (HFCS-55) during the prenatal and/or suckling periods on offspring at 3 and 12 weeks, utilising a cross-fostering approach in a rodent model. Perinatal sucrose exposure decreased plasma glucose concentrations in offspring at 3 weeks, but did not alter glucose tolerance. Increased adiposity was observed in 3-week-old offspring exposed to sucrose or HFCS-55 during suckling, with increased hepatic fat content in HFCS-55-exposed offspring. In terms of specific fatty acids, hepatic monounsaturated (omega-7 and -9) fatty acid content was elevated at weaning, and was most pronounced in sucrose offspring exposed during both the prenatal and suckling periods, and HFCS-55 offspring exposed during suckling only. By 12 weeks, the effects on adiposity and hepatic lipid composition were largely normalised. However, exposure to either sucrose or HFCS-55 during the prenatal period only was associated with elevated plasma free fatty acids at weaning, and this effect persisted until 12 weeks. This study suggests that the type of sugar and the timing of exposure (prenatal or suckling periods) are both important for determining the impact on metabolic health outcomes in the offspring. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Study Type : Animal Study

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