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Abstract Title:

Chronic prostatitis presenting with dysfunctional voiding and effects of pelvic floor biofeedback treatment.

Abstract Source:

BJU Int. 2009 Sep 14. PMID: 19751259

Abstract Author(s):

Wei He, Minfeng Chen, Xiongbing Zu, Yuan Li, Keping Ning, Lin Qi

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE To investigate the features of chronic prostatitis presenting with dysfunctional voiding (DV) and the effects of pelvic floor biofeedback (PFB). PATIENTS AND METHODS The study included 21 patients, diagnosed by having symptoms for >/=3 months, including urinary frequency and urgency, voiding difficulty, upper abdominal or perineal discomfort, and with a score of >/=1 on the first and second part of the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI). Patients with bacterial prostatitis, urethritis, interstitial cystitis, urethral stricture and neurogenic bladder were excluded. All patients had a urodynamic examination, to assess the uroflow curve, maximum urinary flow rate (Q(max)), maximum detrusor pressure during the storage phase (P(det.max)), maximum urethral pressure (MUP) and the maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP) were recorded. PFB was carried out in patients with non-neurogenic detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, and the effects evaluated after 10 weeks. RESULTS Before and after PFB treatment the mean (sd) Q(max), P(det.max), MUP, MUCP were 8.2 (4.1) vs 15.1 (7.3) mL/s, 125.1 (75.3) vs 86.3 (54.2) cmH(2)O, 124.3 (23.3) vs 65.4 (23.0) cmH(2)O and 101.5 (43.6) vs 43.5 (16.7) cmH(2)O, all significantly different (P < 0.05). The respective differences in the pain, urination and life impact subdomain scores, and total scores, of the NIH-CPSI were 4.0 (2.0) vs 2.2 (1.7), 7.9 (2.1) vs 2.2 (1.9), 9.6 (2.7) vs 2.9 (2.6) and 21.7 (4.8) vs 8.4 (4.6), and all differences were significant (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS There might be DV in patients with chronic prostatitis and lower urinary tract symptoms. Urodynamics showed a low Q(max) and increasing intravesical pressure and, in some patients, increasing urethral pressure. Urodynamics could be used to help in the diagnosis, and to select the most appropriate treatment. PFB had satisfactory short-term effects on these patients.

Study Type : Human Study

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Sayer Ji
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