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Abstract Title:

Risk of lung cancer and consumption of vegetables and fruit in Japanese: a pooled analysis of cohort studies in Japan.

Abstract Source:

Cancer Sci. 2015 May 29. Epub 2015 May 29. PMID: 26033436

Abstract Author(s):

Kenji Wakai, Yumi Sugawara, Ichiro Tsuji, Akiko Tamakoshi, Taichi Shimazu, Keitaro Matsuo, Chisato Nagata, Tetsuya Mizoue, Keitaro Tanaka, Manami Inoue, Shoichiro Tsugane, Shizuka Sasazuki,

Article Affiliation:

Kenji Wakai

Abstract:

International reviews have concluded that consumption of fruit and vegetables might decrease the risk of lung cancer. However, the relevant epidemiological evidence still remains insufficient in Japan. Therefore, we performed a pooled analysis of data from four population-based cohort studies in Japan with>200,000 participants and>1,700 lung cancer cases. We computed study-specific hazard ratios by quintiles of vegetable and fruit consumption as assessed by food frequency questionnaires. Summary hazard ratios were estimated by pooling the study-specific hazard ratios with a fixed-effect model. In men, we found inverse associations between fruit consumption and the age- and area-adjusted risk of mortality or incidence of lung cancer. However, the associations were largely attenuated after adjustment for smoking and energy intake. The significant decrease in risk among men remained only for a moderate level of fruit consumption; the lowest summary hazard ratios were found in the third quintile of intake (mortality: 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.60-0.84; incidence: 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.70-0.98). This decrease in risk was mainly detected in ever smokers. Conversely, vegetable intake was positively correlated with the risk of incidence of lung cancer after adjustment for smoking and energy intake in men (trend P, 0.024); the summary hazard ratio for the highest quintile was 1.26 (95% confidence interval 1.05-1.50). However, a similar association was not detected for mortality from lung cancer. In conclusion, a moderate level of fruit consumption is associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer in men among the Japanese population. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Study Type : Human Study

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Sayer Ji
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