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Abstract Title:

Low admission LDL-cholesterol is associated with increased 3-year all-cause mortality in patients with non ST segment elevation myocardial infarction.

Abstract Source:

Cancer. 1995 Dec 15;76(12):2491-6. PMID: 19437396

Abstract Author(s):

Mouaz H Al-Mallah, Hazem Hatahet, João L Cavalcante, Sanjaya Khanal

Article Affiliation:

Division of Cardiology, Henry Ford Heart and Vascular Institute, Detroit, MI 48202, USA. malmall1@hfhs.org

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: The relationship between admission low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels and long-term outcomes has not been established in patients with acute coronary syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that patients who develop non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) despite low LDL have a worse cardiovascular outcome in the long term. METHODS: Patients admitted with NSTEMI between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2000 and with fasting lipid profiles measured within 24 hours of admission were selected for analysis. Baseline characteristics and 3-year all-cause mortality were compared between the patients with LDL above and below the median. Multivariate analysis was used to determine the predictors of all-cause mortality, and adjusted survival was analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard model. RESULTS: Of the total of 517 patients, 264 had LDL105 mg/dL. There was no difference in age, gender, severity of coronary artery disease, and left ventricular ejection fraction between the 2 groups. Thirty-six percent of patients with LDL105 mg/dL were on lipid-lowering therapy on admission. After 3 years, patients with admission LDL105 mg/dL (14.8% vs. 7.1%, p = 0.005). The higher all-cause mortality persisted (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0-3.5, p = 0.05) even after adjustment for confounding variables. CONCLUSIONS: In our cohort, lower LDL-cholesterol at admission was associated with decreased 3-year survival in patients with NSTEMI. Whether this was a result of current therapy or a marker for worse baseline characteristics needs to be studied further.

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Sayer Ji
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