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Abstract Title:

Sugar-Containing Beverages Consumption and Obesity in Children Aged 4-5 Years in Spain: the INMA Study.

Abstract Source:

Nutrients. 2019 Aug 1 ;11(8). Epub 2019 Aug 1. PMID: 31374897

Abstract Author(s):

Sandra Gonzalez-Palacios, Eva-María Navarrete-Muñoz, Manoli García-de-la-Hera, Laura Torres-Collado, Loreto Santa-Marina, Pilar Amiano, Maria-Jose Lopez-Espinosa, Adonina Tardon, Isolina Riano-Galan, Martine Vrijheid, Jordi Sunyer, Jesus Vioque

Article Affiliation:

Sandra Gonzalez-Palacios

Abstract:

The consumption of sugar-containing beverages (SCB) has been associated with obesity although the evidence in preschool children is scarce. Cross-sectional analyses were performed to assess the association between obesity and SCB consumption (packaged juices and sugar-sweetened soft drinks) in 1823 children at the age of 4-5 years from the INfancia y Medio Ambiente (INMA) Project. One drink was defined as a glass of 175 mL, and the consumption of SCB was categorized in<1, 1-7 drinks/week and>1 drink/day. We used multiple logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR). The average SCB consumption was 79.1 mL/day, mainly from packaged juices (80.9%). The SCB consumption was lower in non-obese children than in children with obesity, 76.6 vs 118.4 mL/day (= 0.02). After adjusting for covariates, children who consumed>1 drink/day showed elevated odds of obesity, OR = 3.23 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.48-6.98) compared to children who consumed<1 SCB drink a week. Each additional SCB drink per day was associated with higher odds of obesity, OR = 1.55 (1.14-2.09). Higher consumption of packaged juices, but not sugar-sweetened soft drinks, was significantly associated with higher odds of obesity, OR = 1.55 (1.09-2.15) and OR = 1.59 (0.76-3.39), respectively. A higher SCB consumption is associated with obesity in preschool children, mainly due to the consumption of packaged juices.

Study Type : Human Study

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Sayer Ji
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