Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

n/a
Article Publish Status: FREE
Abstract Title:

Nut consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease, total cancer, all-cause and cause-specific mortality: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.

Abstract Source:

BMC Med. 2016 Dec 5 ;14(1):207. Epub 2016 Dec 5. PMID: 27916000

Abstract Author(s):

Dagfinn Aune, NaNa Keum, Edward Giovannucci, Lars T Fadnes, Paolo Boffetta, Darren C Greenwood, Serena Tonstad, Lars J Vatten, Elio Riboli, Teresa Norat

Article Affiliation:

Dagfinn Aune

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Although nut consumption has been associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, data on less common causes of death has not been systematically assessed. Previous reviews missed several studies and additional studies have since been published. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of nut consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease, total cancer, and all-cause and cause-specific mortality.

METHODS: PubMed and Embase were searched for prospective studies of nut consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease, total cancer, and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in adult populations published up to July 19, 2016. Summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random-effects models. The burden of mortality attributable to low nut consumption was calculated for selected regions.

RESULTS: Twenty studies (29 publications) were included in the meta-analysis. The summary RRs per 28 grams/day increase in nut intake was for coronary heart disease, 0.71 (95% CI: 0.63-0.80, I(2) = 47%, n = 11), stroke, 0.93 (95% CI: 0.83-1.05, I(2) = 14%, n = 11), cardiovascular disease, 0.79 (95% CI: 0.70-0.88, I(2) = 60%, n = 12), total cancer, 0.85 (95% CI: 0.76-0.94, I(2) = 42%, n = 8), all-cause mortality, 0.78 (95% CI: 0.72-0.84, I(2) = 66%, n = 15), and for mortality from respiratory disease, 0.48 (95% CI: 0.26-0.89, I(2) = 61%, n = 3), diabetes, 0.61 (95% CI: 0.43-0.88, I(2) = 0%, n = 4), neurodegenerative disease, 0.65 (95% CI: 0.40-1.08, I(2) = 5.9%, n = 3), infectious disease, 0.25 (95% CI: 0.07-0.85, I(2) = 54%, n = 2), and kidney disease, 0.27 (95% CI: 0.04-1.91, I(2) = 61%, n = 2). The results were similar for tree nuts and peanuts. If the associations are causal, an estimated 4.4 million premature deaths in the America, Europe, Southeast Asia, and Western Pacific would be attributable toa nut intake below 20 grams per day in 2013.

CONCLUSIONS: Higher nut intake is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, total cancer and all-cause mortality, and mortality from respiratory disease, diabetes, and infections.

Study Type : Meta Analysis, Review

Print Options


Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2019 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.