Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

Abstract Title:

Curcumin-induced histone hypoacetylation enhances caspase-3-dependent glioma cell death and neurogenesis of neural progenitor cells.

Abstract Source:

Stem Cells Dev. 2006 Apr;15(2):165-74. PMID: 16646663

Abstract Author(s):

Soo-Kyung Kang, Seung-Heun Cha, Hyo-Gon Jeon

Article Affiliation:

Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan, South Korea. skkang@pusan.ac.kr

Abstract:

Acetylation of histones and nonhistone proteins is an important post-translational modification involved in the regulation of gene expression in mammalian cells. Dysfunction of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) is often associated with the manifestation of several diseases. In this report, HATs are new targets for the development of therapeutics. Our studies first proved that curcumin induces histone hypoacetylation in brain cancer cells and finally induces apoptotic cell death through a (PARP)- and caspase 3-mediated manner. In addition, curcumin induces recontrolling of neural stem cell fates. It induces effective neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and migration of neural progenitor cells in vitro in brain-derived adult neural stem cells. We also confirmed the neurogenic effect of curcumin in our in vivo experiments. Curcumin actively suppressed differentiation in astrocytes while promoting differentiation into the neurons associated with decrease of histone H3 and H4 acetylation. We suggest that histone hypoacetylation plays an important role in determine stem cell fate through controlling the simultaneous expression of many genes. Thus, the present finding that curcumin, a nontoxic dietary compound, is a histone acetyltransferase inhibitor would supply a new window to understand further the molecular mechanism of histone acetylase inhibitors (HAI) in cancer and neural stem cells and provide a new target molecule for treating central nervous system disorders.

Study Type : In Vitro Study

Print Options


Key Research Topics

Sayer Ji
Founder of GreenMedInfo.com

Subscribe to our informative Newsletter & get Nature's Evidence-Based Pharmacy

Our newsletter serves 500,000 with essential news, research & healthy tips, daily.

Download Now

500+ pages of Natural Medicine Alternatives and Information.

This website is for information purposes only. By providing the information contained herein we are not diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any type of disease or medical condition. Before beginning any type of natural, integrative or conventional treatment regimen, it is advisable to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare professional.

© Copyright 2008-2019 GreenMedInfo.com, Journal Articles copyright of original owners, MeSH copyright NLM.