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Abstract Title:

Biofeedback for the treatment of stress and urge incontinence.

Abstract Source:

J Urol. 1995 Mar;153(3 Pt 1):641-3. PMID: 7861503

Abstract Author(s):

M Stein, W Discippio, M Davia, H Taub

Abstract:

Biofeedback and pelvic floor electrical stimulation are new modalities that have been advocated for the treatment of urinary incontinence. To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of biofeedback and identify factors predictive of a positive outcome, we prospectively studied 28 patients with stress and urge incontinence. All patients were evaluated with a complete history, physical examination, urinalysis and culture. Of 28 patients 21 were also studied with video urodynamics. Biofeedback was performed with the InCare PRS 8900* machine with each patient undergoing at least 6 office sessions. Quantifiable symptoms, such as frequency, nocturia and urgency, were evaluated before and periodically after treatment. Patients also graded the overall treatment response on a scale of 0 to 3. Biofeedback successfully treated 5 of 14 patients (36%) with stress incontinence and 9 of 21 (43%) with urgency incontinence. Treatment response was durable throughout followup in all responding patients. Additionally, there was a statistically significant decrease in daytime frequency and nocturia following biofeedback (p = 0.038 and p = 0.044, respectively). No pretreatment factors predictive of a positive outcome could be identified. Improvement in perineal muscle tone with time approached statistical significance. We conclude that biofeedback is a moderately effective treatment for stress and urge incontinence, and should be offered to patients as a treatment option. Few patients, however, choose biofeedback as a primary mode of therapy and, due to the availability of other highly successful treatments for stress urinary incontinence, it is unlikely to become a popular treatment option.

Study Type : Human Study
Additional Links
Therapeutic Actions : Biofeedback : CK(191) : AC(20)

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Sayer Ji
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