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Article Publish Status: FREE
Abstract Title:

Added fructose as a principal driver of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a public health crisis.

Abstract Source:

Open Heart. 2017 ;4(2):e000631. Epub 2017 Oct 30. PMID: 29118995

Abstract Author(s):

James J DiNicolantonio, Ashwin M Subramonian, James H O'Keefe

Article Affiliation:

James J DiNicolantonio

Abstract:

Fatty liver disease affects up to one out of every two adults in the western world. Data from animal and human studies implicate added sugars (eg, sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup) in the development of fatty liver disease and its consequences. Added fructose in particular, as a component of added sugars, may pose the greatest risk for fatty liver disease. Considering that there is no requirement for added sugars in the diet, dietary guidelines should recommend reducing the intake of added sugars to just 5% of total calories in order to decrease the prevalence of fatty liver disease and its related consequences.

Study Type : Commentary

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Sayer Ji
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